How Sir Robert Walpole’s son turned 1776 Strawberry Hill House into bachelor pad

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Beautiful photos present the eccentrically-decorated house of the son of Britain’s first Prime Minister Sir Robert Walpole.

Strawberry Hill Home, in Twickenham, Richmond upon Thames, was the house of 18th-Century author Sir Horace Walpole, who was the youngest son of Sir Robert. 

Accomplished in 1776, Sir Horace extensively constructed the house in an ornamental fashion which has typically been described as ‘Queer Gothic’.  

Footage present its Gothic arches, it is brightly-coloured partitions, intricate banisters and tall stained glass home windows. 

Sir Horace as one in every of a bunch of three male buddies who referred to as themselves the ‘Committee of Style’ and suggested each other on structure and interiors. The chums, John Chute and Richard Bentley, helped to design Sir Horace’s house.

Historic England says that whereas there is no such thing as a proof Sir Horace had any sexual relationships with males, he had a number of ‘shut friendships with different Batchelors’ and was described as an ‘effeminate man’ by his contemporaries.

On his demise in 1797, Sir Horace left the house to his cousin’s daughter, the sculptor Anne Damer, who was a lesbian. She lived there till 1811. 

The conservation physique launched photos of the house, which is closed because of the coronavirus pandemic, to mark LGBT Historical past Month this month. Beneath, MailOnline highlights among the greatest footage of Strawberry Hill. 

Stunning images show the eccentrically-decorated home of the son of Britain's first Prime Minister Sir Horace Walpole. Strawberry Hill, in Twickenham, Richmond upon Thames, was the home of 18th-Century writer Sir Horace Walpole, who was the youngest son of Sir Robert

Beautiful photos present the eccentrically-decorated house of the son of Britain’s first Prime Minister Sir Horace Walpole. Strawberry Hill, in Twickenham, Richmond upon Thames, was the house of 18th-Century author Sir Horace Walpole, who was the youngest son of Sir Robert 

Completed in 1776, Sir Horace extensively built the home in a decorative style which has often been described as 'Queer Gothic'. Sir Horace as one of a group of three male friends who called themselves the 'Committee of Taste' and advised one another on architecture and interiors

Accomplished in 1776, Sir Horace extensively constructed the house in an ornamental fashion which has typically been described as ‘Queer Gothic’. Sir Horace as one in every of a bunch of three male buddies who referred to as themselves the ‘Committee of Style’ and suggested each other on structure and interiors

Pictures show its Gothic arches, it's brightly-coloured walls, intricate bannisters and tall stained glass windows. Pictured: The intricate ceiling and patterned floor inside Strawberry Hill house

Footage present its Gothic arches, it is brightly-coloured partitions, intricate bannisters and tall stained glass home windows. Pictured: The intricate ceiling and patterned ground inside Strawberry Hill home

Historic England says that while there is no evidence Sir Horace had any sexual relationships with men, he had several 'close friendships with other Batchelors' and was described as an 'effeminate man' by his contemporaries. Above: A 1910 print of Sir Horace

Historic England says that whereas there is no such thing as a proof Sir Horace had any sexual relationships with males, he had a number of ‘shut friendships with different Batchelors’ and was described as an ‘effeminate man’ by his contemporaries. Above: A 1910 print of Sir Horace

The Walpoles of Norfolk: The upbringing and lifetime of Britain’s first Prime Minister Sir Robert

Horatio Walpole, later created 1st Baron Walpole, was born in 1678 in Houghton, Norfolk. Wolterton Corridor, 25 miles away, was constructed for him in 1722.

Lord Walpole was an English diplomat and son of Colonel Robert Walpole, the MP for Fort Rising within the county – the seat that may later be represented in Parliament by his different son, Robert.

Sir Robert Walpole is usually considered the primary prime minister of Nice Britain. He was born in 1676 and was a member of the gentry class; educated at Eton and Cambridge, earlier than getting into the Commons in his early twenties.

His de facto tenure as prime minister started in April 1721, when he was appointed First Lord of the Treasury. The place was created after the Hanoverian succession of George I in 1714, in a constitutional shake-up.

He was appointed to the put up a 12 months after the South Sea Bubble monetary disaster. Sir Robert was capable of restore confidence within the authorities after the crash, which wrecked the nation’s funds and embarrassed the elite.

The shrewd politician realised that the King would not have the ability to govern straight, however he, as a chief minister, may train energy within the new constitutional framework.

He was First Lord of the Treasury for over twenty years, an unusually lengthy interval in workplace. Walpole lived in 10 Downing Road from 1735 having insisted that it change into the residence of the First Lord of the Treasury, quite than being given to him personally.

In 1742 he was elevated to the Lords because the Earl of Orford and retired to his nation house, Houghton Corridor, near the house of his youthful brother at Wolterton. 

The household’s surname is taken from the village of Walpole within the south of the county.

On his death in 1797, Sir Horace left the home to his cousin's daughter, the sculptor Anne Damer, who was a lesbian. She lived there until 1811.  The history of the home began in 1747, when Sir Horace bought what was then 'Chopp'd Straw Hall', one of the last remaining sites on the banks of the Thames in fashionable Twickenham which was still available to purchase. Pictured: Open doors from the stairway leading into the home's brightly-coloured rooms

On his demise in 1797, Sir Horace left the house to his cousin’s daughter, the sculptor Anne Damer, who was a lesbian. She lived there till 1811.  The historical past of the house started in 1747, when Sir Horace purchased what was then ‘Chopp’d Straw Corridor’, one of many final remaining websites on the banks of the Thames in trendy Twickenham which was nonetheless out there to buy. Pictured: Open doorways from the stairway main into the house’s brightly-coloured rooms

Sir Horace then set about transforming what was then just a couple of cottages into what he described as a 'little Gothic castle', complete with battlements, pinnacles and a round tower. It was then that Strawberry Hill House was born. Even during his lifetime, the home was a tourist attraction

Sir Horace then set about remodeling what was then simply a few cottages into what he described as a ‘little Gothic citadel’, full with battlements, pinnacles and a spherical tower. It was then that Strawberry Hill Home was born. Even throughout his lifetime, the house was a vacationer attraction

The home as Walpole's summer residence and he allowed four visitors each day. The tours were conducted by his housekeeper. Rules stipulated that no children were allowed. Sir Horace also enjoyed entertaining foreign ambassadors, royalty and members of the English aristocracy. According to Historic England's website, Sir Horace wrote of his distinguished visitors, 'Dowagers like flounders inhabit all around'. Pictured: The library in the home, complete with intricately decorated shelving and stained glass windows

The house as Walpole’s summer season residence and he allowed 4 guests every day. The excursions had been performed by his housekeeper. Guidelines stipulated that no youngsters had been allowed. Sir Horace additionally loved entertaining overseas ambassadors, royalty and members of the English aristocracy. In accordance with Historic England’s web site, Sir Horace wrote of his distinguished guests, ‘Dowagers like flounders inhabit throughout’. Pictured: The library within the house, full with intricately embellished shelving and stained glass home windows

Strawberry Hill House's popularity saw it become a key factor in the emergence of Gothic Revival architecture which flourished in both the 18th and 19th Centuries

It took its inspiration from Gothic cathedrals around Europe. The style was initially popular throughout Europe from the late 12th-Century to the 16th-Century

Strawberry Hill Home’s recognition noticed it change into a key issue within the emergence of Gothic Revival structure which flourished in each the 18th and nineteenth Centuries. It took its inspiration from Gothic cathedrals round Europe. The fashion was initially widespread all through Europe from the late Twelfth-Century to the Sixteenth-Century

The home was largely designed by Walpole's friends, John Chute and Richard Bentley. The trio were otherwise known as the 'Committee of Taste'. The poet Thomas Gray described the home as 'all Gothicism, gold and looking glass'. Pictured: The patterned doors and floral wallpaper

The house was largely designed by Walpole’s buddies, John Chute and Richard Bentley. The trio had been in any other case generally known as the ‘Committee of Style’. The poet Thomas Grey described the house as ‘all Gothicism, gold and looking out glass’. Pictured: The patterned doorways and floral wallpaper

Sir Horace died in 1797 and his home passed on to his cousin's daughter, the renowned sculptor Anne Seymour Damer. She was known to have had a close friendship with Mary Berry, who she was introduced to by Sir Horace in 1789. Pictured: The Tribune ceiling in the home, covered with gold-painted patterns

Sir Horace died in 1797 and his house handed on to his cousin’s daughter, the famend sculptor Anne Seymour Damer. She was identified to have had an in depth friendship with Mary Berry, who she was launched to by Sir Horace in 1789. Pictured: The Tribune ceiling within the house, lined with gold-painted patterns

In 1811, the home passed to Sir Horace's great niece, Elizabeth Waldegrave, and then to her grandson John Waldegrave. However, John died prematurely and passed Strawberry Hill to his brother George, the Seventh Earl of Waldegrave.  But after George had been imprisoned for 'riotous behaviour', he vowed to let the home fall into ruin. In 1842, he arranged what was known as the 'Great Sale', in which much of Sir Horace's personal collection was sold off in a matter of days

In 1811, the house handed to Sir Horace’s nice niece, Elizabeth Waldegrave, after which to her grandson John Waldegrave. Nonetheless, John died prematurely and handed Strawberry Hill to his brother George, the Seventh Earl of Waldegrave.  However after George had been imprisoned for ‘riotous behaviour’, he vowed to let the house fall into destroy. In 1842, he organized what was generally known as the ‘Nice Sale’, by which a lot of Sir Horace’s private assortment was offered off in a matter of days

Following George's death in 1846, the home passed to his widow, Lady Frances Waldegrave. She was left with a significant income and had ambitions to secure Strawberry Hill's future. Ten years after her brother's death, she expanded and embellished the home. Whilst remaining faithful to Sir Robert's original vision, she enlarged the hall and added a new floor to the gallery. Pictured: The home's staircase

Following George’s demise in 1846, the house handed to his widow, Girl Frances Waldegrave. She was left with a major revenue and had ambitions to safe Strawberry Hill’s future. Ten years after her brother’s demise, she expanded and embellished the house. While remaining devoted to Sir Robert’s authentic imaginative and prescient, she enlarged the corridor and added a brand new ground to the gallery. Pictured: The house’s staircase

Lady Waldegrave also built her grand drawing room, dining room and billiard room, but none are part of Strawberry Hill House today. She also raised the Round Tower, which does still stand, another storey. Lady Waldegrave also added the home's 'Tudour' chimney pots, which are modelled on the style of Henry VIII's palace Hampton Court. The house became well-known as the site of parties hosted by Lady Waldegrave for the liberal establishment. Pictured: The door leading to the Tribune ceiling

The Plaid room with its distinctive wallpaper

Girl Waldegrave additionally constructed her grand drawing room, eating room and billiard room, however none are a part of Strawberry Hill Home as we speak. She additionally raised the Spherical Tower, which does nonetheless stand, one other storey. Girl Waldegrave additionally added the house’s ‘Tudour’ chimney pots, that are modelled on the fashion of Henry VIII’s palace Hampton Courtroom. The home turned well-known as the location of events hosted by Girl Waldegrave for the liberal institution. Pictured left: The door resulting in the Tribune ceiling. Proper: The Plaid room with its distinctive wallpaper

Lady Waldegrave died in 1879 and the home was sold to the De Stern family. It was then sold again in 1923 to St Mary's University College, which still owns the site. Pictured: The stunning lantern in the stairway and hall, which reflects stained glass shadows onto the surrounding walls

Girl Waldegrave died in 1879 and the house was offered to the De Stern household. It was then offered once more in 1923 to St Mary’s College School, which nonetheless owns the location. Pictured: The gorgeous lantern within the stairway and corridor, which displays stained glass shadows onto the encircling partitions 

Extensive redevelopments were carried out on the home by the college and a chapel, lecture room and dormitory blocks were built in the grounds. However, the college was bombed during the Second World War, meaning a new chapel had to be built which was cut off from Sir Horace's original garden. Pictured: The hall in the home

Intensive redevelopments had been carried out on the house by the faculty and a chapel, lecture room and dormitory blocks had been constructed within the grounds. Nonetheless, the faculty was bombed in the course of the Second World Struggle, which means a brand new chapel needed to be constructed which was reduce off from Sir Horace’s authentic backyard. Pictured: The corridor within the house 

Sir Horace was a pivotal figure in 18th-Century society. He was the author of The Castle of Otranto, which is known as the world's first Gothic novel. Pictured: The home's hall, leading to the stairway

A stained glass window

Sir Horace was a pivotal determine in 18th-Century society. He was the creator of The Fort of Otranto, which is named the world’s first Gothic novel.  Pictured left: The house’s corridor, resulting in the stairway. Proper: A stained glass window

A print from 1792 of the gallery of Strawberry Hill House. The home's current design is faithful to Sir Horace's original project

A print from 1792 of the gallery of Strawberry Hill Home. The house’s present design is devoted to Sir Horace’s authentic challenge

Books written by 18th-Century scholar Sir Horace Walpole – the youngest son of Britain’s first Prime Minister:

Non-fiction: 

  • 1757: Letter from Xo Ho to his Pal Lien Chi at Pekin
  • 1762: Some Anecdotes of Portray in England
  • 1763: Catalogue of Engravers
  • 1780: On Fashionable Gardening
  • 1784: A Description of the Villa of Mr. Horace Walpole
  • 1793: Historic Doubts on the life and Reign of Richard III
  • Catalogue of Royal and Noble Authors
  • Memoirs of the Final Ten Years of George II
  • Memoirs of the Reign of George III
  • Letters

Fiction: 

  • 1764: The Fort of Otranto
  • 1768: The Mysterious Mom: A Tragedy
  • 1785: Hieroglyphic Tales 



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